ChessWorld - Time Limits FAQ's


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The clock on ChessWorld acts in exactly the same way as in OTB chess. Your clock starts as soon as your opponent makes his/her move and stops when you make your own move.

Players may choose from a range of limits between 1 and 15 days per move. For each move in the game the limit chosen will be the maximum time per move. Players may choose to make their moves at any time within the limits for the particular game. Although it is possible to make every move at the last moment before the time limit expires, it is an accepted convention on ChessWorld that this practice is avoided as far as possible. There are, of course, good reasons why a move cannot be made before the time is nearly up. For example, pressures of work or other interests, or simply the difficulty in making the best move in the particular position. However, it is considered unlikely that each and every move throughout the game will need to be at the maximum time. It is a courtesy to your opponent to make your moves as soon as you feel confident with your decision.

As soon as you exceed the time limit your opponent is entitled to claim the game by default. Of course, in many cases your opponent is likely to be quite reasonable and may be prepared to delay claiming the win for a short period of time. In Tournament games there is a limit of (2 x the time limit of the tournament) + 1 day before the game is automatically** ended by default with no player being able to claim a win. Such a game is marked T-T, (implying no result, or game abandoned), and will not appear on your records.

In the case of Knock Out Tournaments this latter rule is applied differently in all rounds up to, but not including, the final round, so as to protect the integrity of the Tournament for other players. When the checking process is invoked any games that have exceeded the T-T limits, as described above, are awarded to White or Black, as deemed appropriate, so that the next round can be paired. This special procedure may be delayed up to 35 days beyond the normal T-T limits.

A player is defined as being 'out of time' at the end of the last full day of the relevant Time Limit. For the purposes of the Time Limit, the first day starts when the board first becomes available, normally, for example, when a Tournament starts. Each successive day is measured as elapsed periods of 24 hours. After the initial move, by White, time is measured from the moment when the last move was played. For example, in a 5-day Time Limit, the time expires at the end of day 5, so that the  Claim Win  button effectively appears at the start of day 6.

The  Claim Win  button is only available when it is your opponents turn to play.

** The process is delayed for a minimum of five days after the player to move has returned from holiday.

Variable time limits have the advantage that players can choose how they allocate their time within the game.

When you play a game with the ChessWorld Variable Time Limit you are expected to make at least 10 moves within 50 days. In addition, you may take no longer than 10 days, (the secondary limit), for any single move.

This means that you can take as much, (up to the secondary limit), or as little, time as you wish for each of those 10 moves provided that they are completed within 50 days. For example, for 10 moves you could take 5 days for each move, which is exactly what you would be allowed in a normal 5-day game. However, the advantage with a Variable Time Limit is that you can vary the time to suit your circumstances or the relative state of the game. You may need to be away from the computer for several days: with Fixed Limits you may be forced into time problems whereas in the variable system you can catch up with your moves later, always bearing in mind the need to complete at least 10 moves in 50 days. In the early stages of a game you may be able to make several moves very quickly and by so doing give yourself more time to consider your moves later in the game.

Bear in mind that if you take 10 days for each of five consecutive moves you will have reached the time limit of 50 days. You will not have exceeded the time limit for each individual move but you will have exceeded the allowance of 50 days for 10 moves. In such a case your opponent would be able to claim the game from you!

The limit works on a 'rolling' basis so that moves 1-10 must be completed within 50 days, moves 2-11 in 50 days and so on.

Important!

When playing Fixed Time Limits a player is defined as being 'out of time' at the end of the last full day of the relevant Time Limit, as explained above

However, when using a Variable Time Limit, the internal processes and calculations to determine, and record, the relevant timescales, for cumulative and individual moves, are necessarily more complex. As such, and to include some tolerance for any possible 'rounding' errors which may, otherwise, unfairly penalise a player, the 'Claim Win' procedures are invoked at the
end of the 51st day, rather than at the start.

The  Claim Win  button is only available when it is your opponents turn to play and when one of two conditions have been met. Either the opponent has not observed the primary limit, that is, has failed to complete 10 moves in 50 days, or has not observed the secondary limit, taking longer than 10 days over a single move. If either time limit is not observed the game may be claimed.



In variable time limit games a useful record of the moves and the time taken is available. On your game page, if you click on Time limit: 10 in 50 (click to see stamps) you will see something like:

Example 1:

   Player White: You
   layer Black: Opponent

   It is White's move

   Black's total accumulation in last 10 (or less) moves = 5 day(s)
   White's total accumulation in last 9 (or less) moves = 2 day(s)
   Time spent so far considering next move = 1 day(s)
   White's total reflection time so far = 3

   The time for single move time control aspect takes priority

   White has 9 day(s) left (maximum) for this move

   Because the time spent on consecutive moves is taken into consideration,
   this game has been timestamp audited

 
Move

4 ...
4
3 ...
3
2 ...
2
1 ...
1
Player

Opponent
You
Opponent
You
Opponent
You
Opponent
You
Move

d7d6
f3d4
e7e6
d2d4
e7e6
g1f3
c7c5
e2e4
Move Time

5/2/2006
5/2/2006
5/1/2006
5/1/2006
5/1/2006
4/30/2006
4/29/2006
4/25/2006
Stamp    

7:36:18 PM
1:16:20 PM
7:24:23 PM
2:17:44 PM
2:55:27 PM
1:57:19 PM
4:28:08 PM
3:31:06 PM
Reflection Time

0
1
0
0
1
1
4
0

Example 2:

   Player White: Opponent
   Player Black: You

   It is Black's move

   Black's total accumulation in last 9 (or less) moves = 2 day(s)
   Time spent so far considering next move = 1 day(s)
   The time for single move control takes priority
   Black has 9 day(s) left (maximum) for this move

   White's total accumulation in last 10 (or less) moves = 1 day(s)

   Because the time spent on consecutive moves is taken into consideration,
   this game has been timestamp audited

 
Move

4
3 ...
3
2 ...
2
1 ...
1
Player

Opponent
You
Opponent
You
Opponent
You
Opponent
Move

e4e5
d7d5
g8f6
e7e6
b1c3
g8f6
c2c4
Move Time

5/2/2006
5/2/2006
5/1/2006
5/1/2006
5/1/2006
4/30/2006
4/29/2006
Stamp    

7:35:50 PM
1:20:17 PM
7:23:52 PM
2:00:47 PM
12:17:00 PM
1:57:38 PM
4:31:06 PM
Reflection Time

0
1
0
0
1
1
0


Notice that, in each example, you can easily check how much time you have left before you must make a move, otherwise your opponent may claim the game.

Remember! No single move should take longer than 10 days, and 10 moves must be completed in 50 days.

In common with Fixed Time Limits you may only use the  Claim Win  button when it is your Opponents turn to play.

The clock never stops, even when you are on holiday. To prevent an opponent from claiming a win against you during the time you are on holiday, the  Claim Win  button does not appear on the opponent's game page. In addition, a message Opponent on Holiday is displayed to inform them of your current status.

Even though you are marked as being on holiday, at the dates you have entered via My Stuff ... My Holidays, you can still make moves on any, or all, of your games. This is an important feature because, regardless of how you manage your holidays or games, as the clock never stops, as soon as your booked holiday finishes, the  Claim Win  button will re-appear on your opponents game page if you have exceeded the Time Limit. Because of this you are strongly advised to always add one or two days to the end of any planned holiday so that you have time to make your move(s) before ChessWorld changes your on-board status.

This is particularly important in the case of variable time limit games. For example, while playing in a '10 in 50' Tournament, you may still take up to 35 days holiday, but those days will also be counted against you in the tournament. For example, say that you played 2 moves in 10 days before you take a 35 day holiday. You then return to the site and, because the clock has been counting, you will then have only 5 days left to make another 8 moves. (50 maximum - 35 holiday - 10 days used.)

The  Claim Win  button will appear on the Game Board when the time limit, as measured by the ChessWorld system clock, has been exceeded.

In the special case of Variable Time Limit games, the  Claim Win  button will only appear when it is your opponents turn to move and the cumulative time allowance has been exceeded. Remember that while the game awaits your move, your opponent's clock is 'stopped'. Refer to Q. What is the '10 in 50' Variable Time Limit and how does it work? above for a detailed explanation.

ChessWorld displays an indication of the time since the last move under the  Game  tab on the play page and on the Play ... My Current Games page. The time shown in these locations is provided as a guide only and may be less accurate than the ChessWorld system clock.

All ChessWorld time calculations are based upon Server Time. As ChessWorld is a UK based site Server time is set at GMT, or, during the Summer months, at BST, (British Summer Time, which is equal to GMT + 1 hour). GMT is sometimes referred to as UTC, but the times are identical.

Time calculations, such as time since last move, or time overdue on the time limit for a game are calculated as absolute values. This ensures that Members in all Time Zones are treated equally.

Holiday bookings are linked to Server Time, please refer to the Holidays section of the General FAQ for a detailed explanation.

This information is provided to allow you to check your own, and if you wish, your Opponent's activity on ChessWorld. It is not intended to encourage faster moving within any of the Time Limits illustrated. When a player chooses to play a game within a specific Time Limit they are quite entitled to move as quickly, or as slowly, as they wish within that time limit for any or all of their moves.

        These indicators are also provided as a useful guide when choosing Opponents via the
        Join Games ... Suggest Opponent and Join Games ... Suggest Variety pages.

If you wish to check if your Opponent generally moves more, or less, quickly, within a given Time Limit you may find the indicators quite helpful. You should be aware that the Average Time Per Move is based upon the most recent moves* made by the player in all of their current games at that Time Limit. For example, a player who tends to play faster in 1-day games may prefer to play at a more relaxed rate in a 10-day Tournament.

Equally, although some players may tend to take a longer time to respond, their average rate is likely to be inside the maximum setting. If, however, a player is consistently showing their Average Time Per Move at the top, red, end of the scale, and if they are playing a number of concurrent games, it is possible that they are generally delaying all of their moves until the last few hours of the Time Limit. Although such consistent delayed responses may be irritating to some players, it is, of course, within the rules of the site.

As with all such graphical indicators you should interpret the results with some caution. The speed indicated can be affected by a number of factors such as gameload or the relative state of current games. For example, in the early opening stages it is possible that a player moves quite quickly whereas in the more complex middle game they would (rightly) need more time to consider their best move.

* To ensure that the indicators provide a realistic representation of average performance, the information is based upon a preset number of moves for each Time Limit, and as that limit is reached, the earliest move information is removed and replaced by the latest information. In this way we are able to assure Members that the information is representative of current, as opposed to historical, performance. We do not publish any of the sophisticated criteria that we use to provide the Average Time Per Move graphics.














  FP 16 . 0  May16