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Chess World Online Chess Forum - Karlsbad 1907

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  Play ... Latest Forum Posts > Chess Forums > Chess books
  Karlsbad 1907

Earl of Norfolk

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Tue Jun 15 2010 3:39PM | edited: 3:45:35 | MsgID: 13209774


I was recently watching the series Fall of Eagles on DVD when the name Karlsbad came up (some of the character were "taking the cure" there). It reminded me of a recent purchase I made: the book of the Karlsbad Masters Tournament, 1907.

This excellent book, long available in German, was recently translated into English by Robert Sherwood (don't know anything more about him), who also corrected some of the notes using a Rybka computer. However, the original notes and analysis still hold up remarkably well. All of the games (all 210 of them) were collected by noted analyst Georg Marco, who annotated most of the games in the first half of the tournament. The remainder were annotated by Carl Schlecter, who was also a participant in the tourney.

The tournament was won by Akiba Rubinstein, his first victory in a major tournament. Geza Maroczy came in second. Also playing were Leonhardt, Nimzovich, Schlechter, Vidmar, Duras, Teichmann, Salwe, Wolf, Dus-Chotimirsky, Marshall, Spielmann, Tartakover, Janowsky, Berger, Mieses, Chigorin (his final tournament, he died the following year), Dr. Olland, E.Cohn, and Johner. The only chess giants missing from this lineup were Lasker, Tarrasch, and Amos Burn.

The introduction to the book includes a history of Karlsbad's ties with chess (it hosted a match between Albin and Marco in 1901 and another match between Janowsky and Schlechter in 1902) and how this event came to be, and also discusses the prize fund, the dates and times of the games, rules relating to adjournments and ties, some really fascinating newspaper accounts of the event, and quite a bit more.

I highly recommend this book if you don't own it already.