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Chess World Online Chess Forum - The life in Chess

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The life in Chess

Hi!

Yesterday I received an interesting text from a colleague.
She is an amateur writer, here is my translation to English.
Any comments will be welcome.


I saw you playing chess. I watched the pieces, wandering, light years away from your intricate and always winning strategy. This game is not for me. Immediate like a dog, I can not fancy moves on dazzling algorithms beyond the next two ones.
I just keep watching and thinking ... in ... life! Does who invented chess, did think about us, people?
See if you agree with me:
The king would be our body's health. While he is standing, we are in the game. The other elements exist only to preserve it, ensuring its continuity.
Pawns would be the work, our perspectives of life, our abilities and talents. They are various and we can choose which one best fits to our needs and possibilities. They are also the first to be sacrificed in our lives as soon as we make our choices. The Rooks would be material possessions, success, achievements. The Bishops represent faith, our ideals and our spiritual evolution. Both Rook and Bishop take us far, but none can meet all our expectations, being necessary both, in linear and complementary movements, to cover all areas of our existence. Horses are our friends, the people who surround and support us. Their movements are short, but versatile, nothing can blockade them and they bring joy and beauty to our lives.
The Queen represents love. It is in the Bible: " If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal." (I Corinthians 13:1). It is our most powerful weapon, which has more features. Losing it is a halfway walked for the fall of the King, the end of the game, the dreaded checkmate. And this time, there is a lesson in humility: the only resource to recover it is an insignificant pawn.

Ana Lucia de Medeiros



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  Play ... Latest Forum Posts > Chess Forums > Chess Articles
  The life in Chess

Mr_Toad





 Topics started


Brazil
Fri Aug 6 2010 3:03AM | MsgID: 13389166


Greetings to my fellow Brazilian team-member!

I'm very late in replying to this interesting post, sorry about that.

Ana's representation of the game seems to me to be very apt, particularly the idea of having the queen, the most powerful force on the board, representing 'Love'. I was very struck by the power of her idea - there is something of the Gaia theory in it, everything works together as a single organism.

In this context, the king is the 'body's health' - so one might suppose that checks from the opposing pieces are attacks on his health - which he must block with either 'Love', his 'Friends' or one of his other allies.

But about checkmate? It's a slightly awkward concept, particularly if you have to explain it to newcomers to the game - I talk about this in my blog at:
https://celebratechess.blogspot.com/search/label/The%20concept%20of%20checkmate

According to Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Checkmate) "In early Sanskrit chess (ca. 500-700) the king COULD be captured and this ended the game ... Later the Persians added the additional rule that a king could not be moved into check or left in check. As a result, the king could not be captured. Checkmate was thus the logical and only decisive way of ending a game (since if it was checkmate, any move would be illegal)".

Translating this would lead us to the following equivalences:

1. 'a king could not be moved into check' = 'we must not deliberately put our bodies into mortal danger' ie suicide is a sin!
2. 'a king could not be left in check' = 'when we are sick or in pain we must take restorative/alleviative action'.

Maybe the Persians removed the old rule of checkmate because it signified the complete loss of the king (removed completely from the chessboard/universe) - so, even though the life of the king was at an end, some part of him (the soul) could never be completely lost. Our sould live on forever?!

If anyone is interested, I also made an 'analogy' between the chessboard itself and musical chords:
https://celebratechess.blogspot.com/search/label/Chess%20%28SMYSLOV%29%20%2F%20Music%20%28OPERA%29




hcbsb



 Topics started


Brazil
Fri Apr 16 2010 9:52PM | MsgID: 12979133


Hi!

Yesterday I received an interesting text from a colleague.
She is an amateur writer, here is my translation to English.
Any comments will be welcome.


I saw you playing chess. I watched the pieces, wandering, light years away from your intricate and always winning strategy. This game is not for me. Immediate like a dog, I can not fancy moves on dazzling algorithms beyond the next two ones.
I just keep watching and thinking ... in ... life! Does who invented chess, did think about us, people?
See if you agree with me:
The king would be our body's health. While he is standing, we are in the game. The other elements exist only to preserve it, ensuring its continuity.
Pawns would be the work, our perspectives of life, our abilities and talents. They are various and we can choose which one best fits to our needs and possibilities. They are also the first to be sacrificed in our lives as soon as we make our choices. The Rooks would be material possessions, success, achievements. The Bishops represent faith, our ideals and our spiritual evolution. Both Rook and Bishop take us far, but none can meet all our expectations, being necessary both, in linear and complementary movements, to cover all areas of our existence. Horses are our friends, the people who surround and support us. Their movements are short, but versatile, nothing can blockade them and they bring joy and beauty to our lives.
The Queen represents love. It is in the Bible: " If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal." (I Corinthians 13:1). It is our most powerful weapon, which has more features. Losing it is a halfway walked for the fall of the King, the end of the game, the dreaded checkmate. And this time, there is a lesson in humility: the only resource to recover it is an insignificant pawn.

Ana Lucia de Medeiros