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  I am feeling so little in front of such a brightness....!

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papadoble

Chess rating: 2442



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France
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Wed Jan 17 2007 12:48PM | MsgID: 6012630


Just found additional information on Quike's problem in Biénabe's 'Le Guide des Echecs'. Theme of the composing tourney was Black king alone against White whole army + at least one Loyd line-clearing.

Well the least one can say is that this problem is rich in line-clearing effects... here we see a Bristol followed by two chameleon variations with Loyd line-clearings and Turton doublings...



papadoble

Chess rating: 2442



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Tue Jan 9 2007 7:52PM | MsgID: 5960292


A superb "maximini"!

Puzzle Challenge #1395

Puzzle name: Quike, 1958, #4
Composer: Julian Quike, Le Figaro 1st prize 1958
Stipulation: White to play and mate in 4 moves

Solve the position using the Interactive board below. Click on a piece to move it, then click destination square



Mark as solved | Link from homepage

For more puzzles check out the Chessworld puzzle database



mrmip

Chess rating: 2965



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Finland
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Mon Dec 4 2006 8:05PM | MsgID: 5715404


This puzzle certainly belongs to this cathegory.
Thanks for digging it up Papa.

It seems that the applet does not exactly favor self-mates . In order to see the intended solution as well as getting the replay buttons, you need to 'give up' - eventhough you input the correct solution

As another technical point, whenever I receive an e-mail message detailing that a new composition is available, any 'hint' is readily readable in the message!
Here it was rather too strong! Still a magnificient work...



papadoble

Chess rating: 2442



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Sun Dec 3 2006 1:23PM | edited: 1:32:28 | MsgID: 5706241


I discovered this extraordinary puzzle very recently and I am still amazed...
The hint, which reveals the theme of the composition, makes solving really easy and yet enjoyable I think.

Hint

Puzzle Challenge #1342

Puzzle name: Kirtley, 1986
Composer: Kirtley, 1986
Stipulation: Selfmate in 8 moves, i.e. White to play and force Black to mate White in 8 moves

Solve the position using the Interactive board below. Click on a piece to move it, then click destination square



Mark as solved | Link from homepage

For more puzzles check out the Chessworld puzzle database



papadoble

Chess rating: 2442



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Thu Jan 19 2006 10:36PM | edited: 10:54:14 | MsgID: 3410799


Originally posted by: "mrmip"
and more importantly, can you *prove* (to papadoble's satisfaction ) that this is the only correct solution??




Hello Magical Mip, I am so happy that you seem to understand how deeply frustrated I feel from a general proof of Plaksin problem! So you hope that mulan's soon to come clear solution to Elkies' study will put some balm on my heart. No way!

I still think that my demand of an explanation - not only of a proof game - was (is) legitimate.
I see in the excellent retro site http://www.janko.at/Retros/ you recommended an example of what I was hoping for:

T. Volet
Ded. M. Caillaud & N. Plaksin
1st Prize Rex Multiplex, 1983








Analyse position


Draw

Detailed arguments are given in the solution here: http://www.janko.at/Retros/Glossary/FiftyMoves.htm

The draw stipulation means, quoting the retro site "In retro-problems, a position is a draw whenever it can be proven that necessarily (i.e. in any proof game) fifty consecutive moves have occurred with no capture, no pawn move, and no castling. (Castling has been forgotten in the FIDE tournament rule "

Cheers



mrmip

Chess rating: 2965



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Finland
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Thu Jan 19 2006 1:11PM | edited: 1:12:15 | MsgID: 3406879


Well mulan69... You have not provided the solution for the Elkies' puzzle that started this whole topic.

Which is it, and more importantly, can you *prove* (to papadoble's satisfaction ) that this is the only correct solution??



mrmip

Chess rating: 2965



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Finland
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Sun Jan 15 2006 3:41PM | MsgID: 3379059


Located the glitch and fixed it. The proofgame on my site:

http://www.mrmip.net/mipsofacto/plaksin.htm

should now work correctly. It is no more quick and dirty work - just dirty



mrmip

Chess rating: 2965



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Finland
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Sat Jan 14 2006 3:54PM | MsgID: 3372232




Okay. That might be browser glitch or some other technical (true or false) glitch. Below is the pgn for the proof game. The critical position is just after 39.b2-b3.

[[1.e2-e3 Nb8-c6 2.Bf1-b5 Nc6-a5 3.Nb1-c3 Na5-b3 4.a2xb3 Ng8-f6 5.Ra1-a4 Rh8-g8 6.Ra4-g4 Nf6-h5 7.Rg4-g3 Nh5-f4 8.Bb5-a4 Nf4-g6 9.Ng1-e2 Ng6-h8 10.Ne2-d4 g7-g6 11.Qd1-h5 Bf8-g7 12.Nd4-b5 Bg7-d4 13.Ke1-e2 a7-a6 14.Ke2-f3 Bd4-a7 15.Nb5-d4 b7-b6 16.Kf3-g4 Bc8-b7 17.Nd4-e2 Bb7-e4 18.Ne2-d4 Qd8-b8 19.Nd4-e2 Qb8-b7 20.Ne2-d4 Qb7-c6 21.Nd4-e2 Qc6-c4 22.b3xc4 Be4-c6 23.Ba4-b3 Bc6-a4 24.Nc3-b5 a6xb5 25.Bb3-a2 Ba4-b3 26.Ne2-d4 Ba7-b8 27.Ba2-b1 Ra8-a1 28.Bb1-a2 Bb3-a4 29.Nd4-b3 Ra1-b1 30.Nb3-a1 Ke8-d8 31.Rh1-g1 Kd8-c8 32.Rg1-h1 Kc8-b7 33.Rh1-g1 Kb7-a6 34.Rg1-h1 Ka6-a5 35.Rh1-g1 Ka5-b4 36.Rg1-h1 Bb8-a7 37.Rh1-g1 Rg8-a8 38.Rg1-h1 Ba7-b8 39.b2-b3 Bb8-a7 40.Bc1-b2 Rb1-e1 41.Bb2-e5 Kb4-a3 42.Be5-f4 Ka3-b2 43.Rh1-g1 Kb2-c1 44.Rg1-h1 Kc1-d1 45.Rh1-g1 Kd1-e2 46.Rg1-h1 Re1-b1 47.Rh1-g1 Rb1-b2 48.Ba2-b1 Rb2-a2 49.Rg1-h1 Ra2-a3 50.Bb1-a2 Ba7-b8 51.Rh1-b1 Bb8-a7 52.Rb1-b2 Ke2-f1 53.Kg4-f3 Kf1-g1 54.Kf3-e2 Kg1-h1 55.Ke2-f1 Ba7-b8 56.Rb2-b1 Bb8-a7 57.Rb1-e1 Ba7-b8 58.Re1-e2 Bb8-a7 59.Ba2-b1 Ba7-b8 60.Kf1-e1 Kh1-g1 61.Ke1-d1 Kg1-h1 62.Kd1-c1 Kh1-g1 63.Kc1-b2 Ra3-a2+ 64.Kb2-c3 Ra2-b2 65.Kc3-d3 Kg1-h1 66.Kd3-e4 Kh1-g1 67.Ke4-f3 Kg1-h1 68.Kf3-g4 Kh1-g1 69.Kg4-g5 Kg1-h1 70.Kg5-h6 Kh1-g1 71.Kh6-g7 Kg1-h1 72.Kg7-f8 Kh1-g1 73.Kf8-e8 Kg1-h1 74.Ke8-d8 Kh1-g1 75.Bb1-a2 Rb2-b1 76.Kd8-c8 Bb8-a7+ 77.Kc8-b7 Rb1-f1 78.Re2-e1 Ra8-g8 79.Re1-b1 Rg8-g7 80.Kb7-c8 Ba7-b8 81.Rb1-b2 Kg1-h1 82.Ba2-b1 Kh1-g1 83.Rb2-a2 Kg1-h1 84.Ra2-a3 Kh1-g1 85.Bb1-a2 Rf1-b1 86.Kc8-d8 Rb1-b2 87.Ba2-b1 Rb2-a2 88.Qh5-e2 Kg1-h1 ]]

...And finally we have arrived at the Plaksin's position. But note: Black has done well over 50 moves without pawn moves or captures, while the next move will be exactly white's 50th such move. Therefore in order to avoid the 50 move draw, white MUST now capture or move a pawn. Thus after 89.Qf1+?, black will 'defend' by claiming a 50-move draw, while after 89.Rxg6, white will be able to mate in two easily.

This is the essence of this fine Plaksin problem. Although the play from the critical position up to the problem's starting position can be different, it cannot be done with fewer moves. It takes white exactly 49 moves after b2-b3 to get to the problem position !



Playable game scores in this posting
Playable game #1






jim42078, Lord Ptarmigan

Chess rating: 2239
LCF 114 Fide approx. 1820






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Sat Jan 14 2006 11:50AM | MsgID: 3371068


There were a lot of captures in that proof game where the pieces seemed to change positions rather than come off the board.



mrmip

Chess rating: 2965



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Finland
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Fri Jan 13 2006 9:19PM | MsgID: 3367559


Originally posted by: "jim42078, Lord Ptarmigan"
Look, I can see a mate in 3: 1.Rxg6 Rg8+ 2.Rxg8 any 3.Qf1# or 3.Qe1#,

BUt why is 1.Qf1+ a draw??? And how did the game get into this position anyway?




Well, the game is draw after 1. Qf1+ because black can legimitably demand a draw due to 50 move rule in this case. But if the white's first move is a capture (Rxg6)then only 49 moves have elapsed since the last pawn move b2-b3 and no draw can be claimed! The nature of the position is such that (at least) 49 white moves must have been made since the last pawn move. Please, see the proofgame I provided.

best
mrmip



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