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Chess World Online Chess Forum - Openings that don't work on Chessworld

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  Play ... Latest Forum Posts > Chess Forums > Chess Openings
  Openings that don't work on Chessworld

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dailylama

Chess rating: 1262



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United States
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Thu Mar 17 2005 7:30PM | edited: 7:35:20 | MsgID: 1766691


d4 ...2 c4 has been my favorite opening (at least in symmetrical qp openings) for white for 40 years. I grew up with a brother who played e4 so i got stuck with d4 and there are truths i've noticed here.With th qp opening on the average, unless playing with advanced players, I see people falter as black in their opening more often, and earlier than when responding to a king pawn opening. It's just an observation from lots of years. The queens gambit was a winner for me. Also the comment about strategy being important in the mid games that result from d4 c4 openings seems to be dead on.

Another observation from OTB games is that it was very common in my life to hear my opponent groan when i opened with d4. That must mean something.



Earl of Norfolk

Chess rating: 2482





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Fri Feb 25 2005 6:22PM | MsgID: 1669982


If you follow it up right it is. However, I've noticed on this site that many players start the game with 1 d4, but fail to follow up with the logical 2 c4.



Moosester

Chess rating: 2396



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Fri Feb 25 2005 3:37PM | MsgID: 1669230


It is solid and hard to beat if you are Black and need to win!



KingPower

Chess rating: 1763



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Fri Feb 25 2005 5:48AM | MsgID: 1667618


I prefer d4, less tactical and more strategic. A lot of people are not sure what to do against d4. I play Colle when in doubt, it is solid and has clear objectives. Better to be on familiar ground when you can.



Moosester

Chess rating: 2396



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Sat Jan 22 2005 2:18AM | MsgID: 1515796


I agree, the more opening systems you experience, the greater and faster will develop your understanding of chess as a whole!



Chaos One

Chess rating: 2032





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Netherlands
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Fri Jan 21 2005 3:25PM | MsgID: 1513259


Originally posted by: "Moosester"

I think you have a good point there. I find that the goals in d4 openings are less obvious to the average player(after all, in 1. e4 we can push for d4 or hitting f7), and can go in many different directions. Also, 1.e4 is usually the first opening we learn and the one we are most comfortable with, thus it appears in most of our games. Unless you meet 1.d4 quite often you are more likely to know less about the opening. Would our ratings go up from more victories if we all played 1. d4? I wonder?




I don't think changing e4 in to d4 can have such an impact on a 40-50 moves chess game, but I'm sure it will force black to play a defence that is less practised.

So if black is higher rated then you, playing d4 should even the difference at least for the first couple of moves. Then again, if you know how to play e4, but don't have much experience playing d4 you also have a disadvantage. The more you practice it the better you become at it though.

At least you'll learn how to play d4, you already know e4 and while playing d4 you'll learn how to defend against it to by seeing what your opponent does. So you'll become a better player! I guess.



bancroftkid

Chess rating: 1714



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Fri Jan 21 2005 3:09PM | MsgID: 1513202


Thanks Dan,

Yes, I've toyed with your suggestion in the past and it will probably be my next approach. I've noticed I don't have any problem now with those rated say up to 200 points higher than my rating and lesser rated players.

One's ego does need the odd win and with my present game plan I lose say 8-9 out of ten games. The good news is when I lose it's -2 points and if I win it's +20.

Thus my rating has remained stable for the past year, but it would be nice to win a few in a row.

Have a good day.

I would appreciate more points of view.

George



Moosester

Chess rating: 2396



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Fri Jan 21 2005 3:07PM | MsgID: 1513188


Originally posted by: "Chaos One

Most people go for e4. When I join a tournament and have 15 moves to make I quickly e4 them all. In return I get a lot of e4's back to which I quickly reply. Now the non-e4's force me to think about it. And that's where my theory kicks in.

Most people know what to reply to e4, in fact they have a number of replies. Even the crappy players do (and they even have more replies to e4 than the very good players do, haha). Now my theory is that it should give you a light advantage to practice another opening, even something simple like d4 instead of e4. Players are less trained in replying to non-e4 openings and this could give you an advantage. Not much against very high rated players I guess, they didn't get such a rating only knowing how to reply e4. Still, I played over 400 games now and still when they throw a d4 against me I have to stop and think.






I think you have a good point there. I find that the goals in d4 openings are less obvious to the average player(after all, in 1. e4 we can push for d4 or hitting f7), and can go in many different directions. Also, 1.e4 is usually the first opening we learn and the one we are most comfortable with, thus it appears in most of our games. Unless you meet 1.d4 quite often you are more likely to know less about the opening. Would our ratings go up from more victories if we all played 1. d4? I wonder?



Earl of Norfolk

Chess rating: 2482





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Fri Jan 21 2005 2:17PM | MsgID: 1512993


Originally posted by: "bancroftkid"

My question. Is this a good idea or is it better to simply play those slightly higher in rating? I would certainly win more but........

Opinions everbody?




Playing too many players who are rated much higher than you can lead to discouragement, although an occasional game with a much higher-rated player may teach you a few things, especially if you can get the higher rated player to analyse the game with you afterwards.

However, for steady improvement and to keep from giving way to despair, I think the best course is to play mostly with players rated 100-400 points above you. You'll win some of these games and hopefully learn something from your losses. I think it's also good for the ego, if not for improvement, to go "bunny-bashing" from time to time as well. This will show you, if nothing else, how far you've progressed from the beginner stage.



Chaos One

Chess rating: 2032





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Netherlands
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Fri Jan 21 2005 1:03PM | MsgID: 1512695


I just play anyone.

Players that are rated much lower then me can still make some interesting moves. I don't think it matters very much who you play, the important thing is that you spot your mistakes and learn from them.

Now playing high rated players obviously exposes more mistakes than playing absolute beginners. But like I said, you must spot your mistakes and learn from them.



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