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Chess World Online Chess Forum - Capablanca and the Princess

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Capablanca and the Princess

I found a fascinating article in Edward Winter’s excellent ‘Chess Notes’. It gives many superb insights into the personality and life of the great Jose Raul Capablanca, gleaned from the recollections of his second wife, Olga. Here’s just a few brief excerpts:

‘I don’t think he loved chess. Almost resentfully he said that if chess had not so grabbed him, he would have studied music, or perhaps medicine. So multifaceted was he that I believe he would have been a leading star in whatever field he chose.’

‘Capa was a strong billiards player. I heard an expert say that if he had devoted more time to the game he would have been a champion. The same was said about his tennis by one of the leading players on this continent. Capa could row like a professional and was an excellent driver; his reactions were instantaneous, which was important for he was inclined to drive very fast. I had heard that in his college days, at Columbia University, he was a promising young star, already sought by the Big League, in baseball.’

‘Sometimes, when Capa was free of chess, our driver took us to horse races. I remember that once a magnificent horse named Capablanca was running. By a peculiar quirk of caprice, Capa didn’t bet on him. Then he smiled a bit embarrassedly when everyone rushed to congratulate him – the great horse just waltzed in. “No, I did not”, he answered curtly. “But perhaps she did.” Well, I had very little money to bet, but I won enough to order a new hat.’


You can read the full article here:

Capablanca and the Princess


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  Capablanca and the Princess

cuppablanca





 Topics started


Scotland
Thu Sep 16 2010 6:19PM | MsgID: 13538108


Thanks for that - I'll look it out.



Earl of Norfolk





 Topics started


United States
Thu Sep 16 2010 5:11PM | edited: 5:13:10 | MsgID: 13537928


[Quote from: "cuppablanca"]
[Quote from: "Earl of Norfolk"]I have that book....



Which book is it?



A Chess Omnibus, by Edward Winter. He gathered many of his Chess Notes articles and published them as a book.

http://www.amazon.com/Chess-Omnibus-Edward-Winter/dp/1888690178



cuppablanca





 Topics started


Scotland
Thu Sep 16 2010 4:21PM | MsgID: 13537786


Originally posted by: "Earl of Norfolk"
I have that book....




Which book is it?



Earl of Norfolk





 Topics started


United States
Thu Sep 16 2010 3:32PM | MsgID: 13537656


I have that book, so have read this all before. It is a very excellent and interesting read, although I think that Mrs. Capablanca's assessment of her husband's non-chess abilities is based more on wifely love than reality.



cuppablanca





 Topics started


Scotland
Wed Sep 15 2010 11:10AM | MsgID: 13533334


I found a fascinating article in Edward Winter’s excellent ‘Chess Notes’. It gives many superb insights into the personality and life of the great Jose Raul Capablanca, gleaned from the recollections of his second wife, Olga. Here’s just a few brief excerpts:

‘I don’t think he loved chess. Almost resentfully he said that if chess had not so grabbed him, he would have studied music, or perhaps medicine. So multifaceted was he that I believe he would have been a leading star in whatever field he chose.’

‘Capa was a strong billiards player. I heard an expert say that if he had devoted more time to the game he would have been a champion. The same was said about his tennis by one of the leading players on this continent. Capa could row like a professional and was an excellent driver; his reactions were instantaneous, which was important for he was inclined to drive very fast. I had heard that in his college days, at Columbia University, he was a promising young star, already sought by the Big League, in baseball.’

‘Sometimes, when Capa was free of chess, our driver took us to horse races. I remember that once a magnificent horse named Capablanca was running. By a peculiar quirk of caprice, Capa didn’t bet on him. Then he smiled a bit embarrassedly when everyone rushed to congratulate him – the great horse just waltzed in. “No, I did not”, he answered curtly. “But perhaps she did.” Well, I had very little money to bet, but I won enough to order a new hat.’


You can read the full article here:

Capablanca and the Princess