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Chess Calculation: Try not to calculate anything! Magnus Carlsen example (Chessworld.net)


♚Play turn style chess at Chessworld.net: http://www.chessworld.net/chessclubs/asplogin.asp?from=1053 Instructive game tags: chess discussion video, chess calculation, should we try and avoid chess calculation sometimes, how human intuition can trump calculation, how intuition can tell us when to stop calculating down a certain line or variation, carlsens queen attacked, decision of where to move queen, how to support decision making process, concrete evidence vs intuitive evidence, feeling for positions, different levels of chess abstraction, centralising queen move played instead of flank move attacking pawn, qb5 rejected because of quick assessment of not much counterplay, abstractly queen going away from king is bad king safety pattern, checking number of attacking pieces vs defender pieces, numerical superiority assessment of attacking pieces, intuitively without tonnes of analysis reaching a decision, playing moves on a practical basis rather than intense concrete analysis, thinking processes in chess, removing defenders, number of defenders in a sector of the board, looking at the sources of forcing moves, forcing moves come from pieces in a particular sector of the board, comparing numerical superiority of pieces, playing on general principles, mcshane spent 30 minutes checking sacrifices and variations, carlsen ends up playing a forcing move to break whites positional bind, bean counting vs intuition, candidate move analysis can be overrated or unjustified, causal effect analysis, seeing causes rather than effects, checking causes at an abstract level, conceptual tools to assess and evaluate positions, doing a causal analysis and playing moves based on a causal analysis, Qd6 has a latent threat against Bishop on f6 in any case, pieces in the centre naturally carry more threads, Queen on d6 is more centralised than Queen on b5, kotovs candidate move trees is great for computers but may not be always appropriate for human beings, immortal games based often on king safety and forcing moves, chess as a war of patterns as opposed to a war of bean counting, chess as a patterns war, more abstract than just steinitzian elements - quantity of attacking vs defensive pieces, counterplay levels, number of centralised pieces, centralising pieces to carry more latent threats, respecting the center of chess as a source of threats and defensive resources, keeping piece flexibility, offside move vs centralising move, Nxg5 forcing move based on more central queen position, queen away from king is dangerous, computers confirm what we think instinctivey, the power of instinct, the cause of forcing moves, causal assessment, using intuition to rule out moves efficiently, still checking forcing moves as well [Event "London Chess Classic"] [Site "London ENG"] [Date "2012.12.01"] [Round "1"] [White "Luke McShane"] [Black "Magnus Carlsen"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C67"] [PlyCount "124"] [EventDate "2012.12.01"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. Re1 Nd6 6. Nxe5 Be7 7. Bf1 Nf5 8. Nf3 O-O 9. d4 d5 10. g3 Bf6 11. c3 Re8 12. Rxe8+ Qxe8 13. Bf4 Qd8 14. Bd3 Nfe7 15. Na3 a6 16. Nc2 Bf5 17. Bxf5 Nxf5 18. g4 Nfe7 19. Ne3 g6 20. Qf1 Qd7 21. Qh3 Bg7 22. Qg3 Rc8 23. g5 Nd8 24. Be5 Ne6 25. Bf6 Re8 26. Ne5 Qd6 (26... Qb5 27. Qh3 (27. b3) (27. Qf3 Qxb2 28. Bxg7 Qxa1+ 29. Kg2 Nxg5 30. Qf6 Qb1 31. Bh6 Nf5 32. Bxg5 Nxe3+ 33. fxe3 Qf5 34. Qxf5 gxf5) (27. Qf3 Qxb2 28. Rf1 Bf8 29. Bxe7 Rxe7 30. Nxd5 Nxg5 31. Qg2 Ne6 32. f4 Qxg2+ 33. Kxg2 f6 34. Nxe7+ Bxe7 35. Nd3) (27. b3) (27. Qf3 Qxb2 28. Bxg7 Qxa1+ 29. Kg2 Nf5 30. Nxf5 Nxg5 31. Qg4)) ( 26... Qb5 27. Bxg7 Kxg7 28. Re1 Ng8 29. b3 Qa5 30. Nd7) 27. Kh1 (27. h4) 27... Nxg5 28. Bxg5 f6 29. Bxf6 Qxf6 30. Re1 c6 31. Kg2 Nc8 32. N3g4 Qd8 33. Nd3 Rxe1 34. Nxe1 Nd6 35. Nd3 Nf5 36. Qh3 Bf8 37. Ne3 Qg5+ 38. Kf1 Nxe3+ 39. fxe3 Kg7 40. Nf4 Qf6 41. Ke2 Bd6 42. Qg4 Kf7 43. h3 h5 44. Qc8 Qe7 45. Nd3 Kf6 46. b3 Kg5 47. c4 Kh4 48. c5 Bg3 49. b4 Qf7 50. a4 g5 51. Kd2 Bh2 52. Ne1 Kg3 53. Nc2 Bg1 54. Qd8 Kh4 55. Qc8 Bf2 56. Ke2 Kg3 57. Qd8 Qf5 58. Kd2 Kxh3 59. b5 g4 60. bxc6 bxc6 61. Nb4 g3 62. Nd3 g2 0-1 ►Support the channel by donating via PayPal: http://goo.gl/7HJcDq ►Playlists: http://www.chessworld.net/chessclubs/playlistvideosstructure.asp ►Kingscrusher's Greatest Hit Videos! : http://tinyurl.com/6vvx6qe ►Play FREE online chess at http://www.chessworld.net or realtime at http://www.chessclub.com/from/kingscrusher ►Subscribe for my regular chess videos: http://goo.gl/zpktUK ►Support the channel by donating via PayPal: http://goo.gl/7HJcDq